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Let’s be honest America will never stop killing Black people

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The killings of Black people dating back generations and beyond at this point are no accident. They’re not accidents; they’re not justified, they’re not anything of the kind that law enforcement and the like even claims up to this day.

They’re cold; calculated, and entrenched acts of terror that law enforcement and their cronies have perpetuated against Black and minority people in the United States since the dawn of the ages. The act of the Americans at this point can be pretty confusing.

Confusing because one has to ask if they wanted to hate and kill us so bad: why did they allow us to be brought here? It couldn’t be because they ever thought we were equal. It couldn’t be because they had ever intended to be nice to us.

And it damn sure wasn’t because they were going to spare us from the terror they’ve inflicted on our families; friends, fathers, brothers, and so on for centuries.

It is because they fear us. The color of our skin; the often idea of a tall Black man, and don’t let someone be strong or “intimidating.”

Intimidation means they’ll taser you till you’re practically unconscious.

Don’t be tall and Black that means America will fear you. Fear means they will kill you. Their fear has been embedded in them since “police” were slave patrols and their fear remained when they were rebranded and called law enforcement. They weren’t always called law enforcement — there was a time they were literally only meant to protect property and check runaway Black people from their white owners.

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Like most areas of life there are good people and then there are bad. But I speak as a young person to those in this field; I speak as a young Black male who has never done anything wrong let alone ever having been arrested, I am speaking directly to law enforcement today in America.

As a young Black male my reality is that at any given time if I am stopped by the wrong officer, evidently I run the risk of losing my life entirely even if I didn’t do anything wrong or to justify being shot. Even if I followed orders; complied, the wrong officer will still shoot me in cold blood and then walk away with almost universal immunity like it never happened. That is our #BlackReality.

If you can’t stop fearing us you have no business in law enforcement. If your first idea at a Black person questioning you within their rights at a traffic stop is to shoot — you have no business being a cop. If the idea of an informed Black person exercising their rights at a traffic stop (with or without alleged warrants) somehow triggers you — you have no business in uniform.

If a Black person simply sitting in their car after a shift as a school lunch person suddenly makes you assume for no real reason that they’re a threat — hang it up you don’t belong behind a badge.

If a Black or minority person complying with lawful orders inside of a train station suddenly still scares you while they’re laying down complying on the rock hard cement and you still shoot — not only hang it up turn yourself in you’re a cold blooded American killer.

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If a Black person sitting outside of a gas station in New York somehow makes you feel threatened because he is a big guy. Stop what you’re doing his size does not make him a criminal. The criminal is the person trying to find a problem where there isn’t one.

Fear [Merriam Webster] an unpleasant emotion caused by being aware of danger : a feeling of being afraid. : a feeling of respect and wonder for something very powerful. fear. verb.

We see what happens when that fear becomes a false reality based on color. Our color evidently matters to these people and their enablers no matter what certain groups of people like to say.

And because it matters it’s time we talk about it.


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